Palaces

Adelaide Cottage

The old keeper's lodge on the Windsor estate converted in 1830 for Queen Adelaide, wife of William IV.

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Ampthill

The royal house of Ampthill, Bedforshire, though now completely forgotten was once one of Henry VIII’s favourite houses.

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Ashridge

After the dissolution of the monasteries, Ashridge became one of Henry VIII's favoured nursery houses, with all his children spending time there.

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Audley End

One of the largest houses to be built in James I's reign, Audley End House was acquired by Charles II after the Civil War.

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Bagshot Lodge

A foresters' lodge reconstructed by James I and extended by Inigo Jones for Charles I, the house was situated in the wider Windsor hunting grounds.

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Bagshot Park

Commissioned by one of Queen Victoria's sons, the Duke of Connaught, the house is currently leased to Prince Edward.

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Balmoral

A favoured private retreat of Victoria and Albert which remains virtually unchanged to this day.

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Baynard’s Castle

Baynard’s Castle was a large 15th century riverside mansion in the City of London which Henry VII extended and granted to the queens consort.

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Beaulieu (New Hall)

Beaulieu, sometimes known as New Hall, was an Essex country house that Henry VIII purchased, expanded and furnished with fine tapestries.

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Beddington

Site of secret meetings between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Beddington was taken by the king when the house's owner was executed for treason.

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Birkhall

A neighbouring estate to Balmoral where the young princesses Elizabeth and Margaret spent many holidays.

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Bridewell

This royal residence started life as Thomas Wolsey's first major building project, before hosting Henry VIII's parliament twice in the 1520s

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Brooke House (Hackney)

Bought by Henry VIII from "the unthrifty earl", the manor house had a fine hall and chapel which was bombed in WWII

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Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is built on a plot of land that King James I owned, and has undergone several substantial remodellings over its illustrious history.

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Byfleet

A medieval timber framed house extensively rebuilt for King Edward II, it became a hunting lodge for Henry VIII

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Canterbury

A monastic property on the route between London and Dover converted into a royal residence entered through a handsome gatehouse

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Carlton House

A major renovation project of George IV before he became king and switched his attention to Buckingham Palace.

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Charing

One of the houses Henry VIII exchanged with Thomas Cranmer Archbishop of Canterbury, the king liked its location between London and the south coast.

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Clarendon

One of the most important royal domestic sites in England, continuously in use as a residence by monarchs from the 11th to the 15th century

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Collyweston House

The country seat of Lady Margaret Beaufort, the Countess of Richmond, Henry VII's mother, remains relatively unknown.

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Dartford

One of the former monastic residences that Henry VIII converted into royal accommodation after the suppression of the monasteries.

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Dover

One of the great royal fortresses of England, the site of the castle has been used as a fort since before the Romans.

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Dunstable

Famously the chapter house that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon was pronounced null and void.

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Durham House

The London residence of the Bishops of Durham. The buildings, started in the 14th century included a great hall on the waterfront of the Thames.

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Eltham Palace

A favoured royal residence for nearly two centuries, Eltham Palace occupied an elevated site in south east London just four miles from Greenwich.

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Esher Place

Esher was one of the manors belonging to the exceedingly rich bishopric of Winchester conveniently located on the road from Winchester to London.

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Fotheringhay

One of Edward IV's favourite country seats, it became the site of Mary Queen of Scot's imprisonment, trial and execution.

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Grafton Regis

Grafton Manor was a house set on rising ground in Northamptonshire improved by Elizabeth I

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Greenwich Palace

Greenwich was originally a 15th century hunting park and house, re-built by Henry VII to become the principal residence of the Tudor monarchy.

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Guildford

One of the most important residences for the early medieval kings, half way between Westminster and Winchester and a day's ride from London.

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Hampton Court

Originally a farm belonging to the Knight’s of St. John of Jerusalem, by the 16th century it was one of the most important royal houses in England

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Holyrood House

Of all Queen Elizabeth II’s palaces the palace of Holyroodhouse can claim, with Windsor, to be the most venerable.

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Hull

One of the sites in north east England that Henry VIII fortified against a potential attack by the Papal powers of Europe.

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Hunsdon House

A splendid mansion in Hertfordshire acquired by Henry VIII, almost completely rebuilt in the early 1800s.

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Kenilworth Castle

Kenilworth in Warwickshire was chosen by Henry VIII as one of the great ancestral castles of the realm.

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Kew Palace

Kew, like Hampton Court, became important because of its proximity to Richmond Palace. The Palace was a favourite of George III and his Queen.

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Leeds Castle

A Norman lodging on a strategic route, owned by a succession of queens until it was refurbished for Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon.

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Ludlow Castle

Ludlow Castle was one of the first generation of stone fortresses built after the Norman Conquest.

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Newmarket

Charles II built the first stables at Newmarket and by doing so founded England’s most venerable training establishment

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Nonsuch Palace

A royal palace, now completely lost, built to be without equal by Henry VIII during his architecturally profligate reign.

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Nottingham Castle

For six hundred years Nottingham Castle was one of the most important royal castles in England, guarding the bridge on the River Trent.

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Oatlands Palace

Few people have heard of Oatlands Palace, but in the 1500s and 1600s it was as well known as Hampton Court, royal residence of successive queens.

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Osborne House

Sir Robert Peel helped Queen Victoria and Prince Albert find the Osborne estate in 1844, which they turned into a large and comfortable family home.

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Otford

Otford was one of Tudor England's largest houses, comparable in size to Hampton Court, before falling into disrepair in the 17th century.

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Pontefract Castle

The most important castle in the North of England during the Civil War, with 15th century royal lodgings.

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Richmond / Sheen

Starting as Edward III's riverside retreat and rebuilt by Henry V, it was one of Elizabeth I's favourite residences and where she died in 1603.

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Royal Pavilion Brighton

A project of George, Prince of Wales (later George IV), the three building phases created the elaborate structure we have today.

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Royal Train

The railways made a huge difference to the way monarchs used their houses, with Edward VII's train becoming, in effect, a mobile palace.

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Royal Yacht Britannia

The British royal family have had a yacht since the Restoration. The last royal yacht was launched in 1953 and decommissioned in 1997.

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Royston

An unusual palace comprising town centre lodgings favoured and developed by James I

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Sandringham

Built as a country house refuge for Queen Victoria's eldest son, Sandringham is a private residence of Her Majesty the Queen.

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Somerset House

Between 1603 and 1692 Somerset House was the official residence of the Queen of England and one of the most controversial buildings in Britain.

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St James’s Palace

St James’s Palace was built by Henry VIII as the residence of the heir to the throne. In 1702 it became the principal London house of the monarchy.

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Theobalds

Originally built by William Cecil, Queen Elizabeth I's chief minister, it was an unusual courtier house which became one of James I's favourite houses

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Tower of London

The Tower of London was once the principal fortress of the kingdom and a royal residence, housing the royal armoury, mint and treasury

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Westminster

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Whitehall Palace

Principal official residence of Henry VIII designed across a busy road in London, the palace covered much of the area that still bears its name.

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Winchester

A magnificent royal house commissioned by Charles II on the site of a medieval castle, designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.

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Windsor

The longest occupied royal residence in Britain, Windsor Castle has been at the centre of court life for more than one thousand years.

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Woking

A royal possession from before the Norman Conquest, the substantial house in the Thames valley was favoured by three tudor monarchs.

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Woodstock

Woodstock, Oxfordshire, was one of England’s oldest royal houses occupied by the Saxon monarchs before the Norman Conquest

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